Compression Stockings After Vein Ablation

You may have recently taken a Vein Quiz, assessing your health and found the right Doctor to help treat your varicose veins! Your Vein Specialist advised a form of thermal ablation, fitting you for compression stockings, and scheduling an additional appointment with you for either, Endovenous Laser Treatment (EVLT) or Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA). You go home with a lot of instructions, like begin wearing stockings now, and bring them with you for use as bandages after your future procedures.

Doctor appointments are overwhelming and it takes time to think of questions you may have regarding therapies. Often times, patients inquire about treatment plans after appointments. It takes time to process unfamiliar information, especially in regards to one’s health.

Gradient Compression Stockings 

When you understand how something works, more often than not, you are more willing to give it a try. There are several forms of support stockings sold in stores, but not all of them are gradient socks! This is a very important distinction to make because the most commonly marketed and sold stockings are non-medical support hose. The compression is not uniform, nor does the pressure gradually ascend as desired. For people with varicose veins or more advanced symptoms of Chronic Venous Insufficiency, the issue is that these types of non-gradient stockings could worsen symptoms.

Physics 101

How do gradient compression stockings work? Keeping it simple savvy, they mimic the venous circulatory system. By applying graded compression at the ankle, pressure travels up the garment, pushing blood flow upwards towards the heart, preventing swelling in the lower extremities. It’s like rolling up a tube of almost empty toothpaste: you are exerting pressure at the base of the tube to move the goo in only one direction. Similarly, gradient compression stockings ensure blood flow is uni-directional towards the heart, rather than refluxing downwards towards the legs or feet.

When blood pools in space-limited vessels, tension rises causing venous hypertension. Gradient compression stockings reverse this process, facilitating the venous return and providing relief from lower extremity swelling! Wearing gradient compression stockings improves circulation preventing the formation of thrombi, or blood clots.

If you’re receiving EVLT of RFA, your Vein Specialist may request you bring your fitted compression stockings with you to use as bandages post vein ablation. Wearing your stockings post-procedure helps to reduce inflammation, bruising, and eases your pain and discomfort!

Treatment Duration

Ever hear, “There’s more than one way to skin a cat!”? Different Doctor’s do things differently. There isn’t any particular reason; perhaps differences in training or medical views. Regardless, if conducting your own online research, you’ll likely come across different treatment recommendations regarding gradient compression stockings. Typically, Vein Specialist’s recommend wearing compression stockings continuously for the first 48 hours post procedure. Though Physician recommendations may differ, research recommends continuing wearing gradient compression stockings for at least one week after ablation. Even following the first week, most Specialists agree: the more you wear them the better.

Tips:

  • Wear gradient compression stockings continuously for 48 hours, (day and night), following treatment.
  • After the first 48 hours, wear stockings during the day until the end of the first week. Some Doctors request you continue wearing them at night, however, some are comfortable with removing them when turning in for the evening.
  • Make sure to remove stockings to bathe and pat dry the treated area before reapplying!
  • If experiencing discomfort, talk with your Vein Specialist! Sometimes compression stockings need refitting or a change in the type of material.

After Vein Ablation

Remember, wearing your fitted compression stockings post-procedure provides you with symptomatic relief! Depending on your Physician’s assessment, the gradient level of stockings you require may fluctuate! Remember: never hesitate to contact your Vein Specialist and always follow their instructions!

Source:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4081237/